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General Aircraft
Discuss the finer points of aviation modeling.
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Aircraft Trivia Quiz 2 (Join In)
ReluctantRenegade
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Posted: Monday, July 22, 2019 - 07:08 AM UTC
The first part is correct, the second is sort of in the right direction but that's not what I meant...
gastec
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Posted: Monday, July 22, 2019 - 09:59 AM UTC
I know there was also a pitot tube issue with moisture affecting the original fitted with recommendation to fit another tyoe.
ReluctantRenegade
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Posted: Monday, July 22, 2019 - 04:50 PM UTC
True, this is what caused the false overspeed indication, but Sully was referring to an Airbus-specific idiosyncrasy.
gastec
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Posted: Monday, July 22, 2019 - 05:57 PM UTC
Was it to do with the asymmetrical controls in Airbus aircraft?
ReluctantRenegade
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Posted: Monday, July 22, 2019 - 08:43 PM UTC
You're getting there...

gastec
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Posted: Monday, July 22, 2019 - 09:33 PM UTC
Stall warning system going silent when in the extreme?
ReluctantRenegade
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Posted: Monday, July 22, 2019 - 11:03 PM UTC
Nope
gastec
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Posted: Tuesday, July 23, 2019 - 12:15 PM UTC
Lack of angle of attack indicator on the instrument panel?
ReluctantRenegade
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Posted: Tuesday, July 23, 2019 - 04:29 PM UTC
You’ve already mentioned the controls - the answer is there...
gastec
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Posted: Tuesday, July 23, 2019 - 06:15 PM UTC
Asymmetrical controls? The fact one pilot csn't feel what the other is doing?
ReluctantRenegade
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Posted: Tuesday, July 23, 2019 - 07:29 PM UTC
True! That's 50% of the right answer. What's the other half?



gastec
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Posted: Tuesday, July 23, 2019 - 09:22 PM UTC
In April 2012 in The Daily Telegraph, British journalist Nick Rosspublished a comparison of Airbus and Boeing flight controls; unlike the control yoke used on Boeing flight decks, the Airbus side stickcontrols give little visual feedback and no sensory or tactile feedback to the second pilot. Ross reasoned that this might in part explain why the pilot flying's fatal nose-up inputs were not countermanded by his two colleagues.

In a July 2012 CBS report, Sullenberger suggested the design of the Airbus cockpit might have been a factor in the accident. The flight controls are not mechanically linked between the two pilot seats, and Robert, the left-seat pilot who believed he had taken over control of the aircraft, was not aware that Bonin continued to hold the stick back, which overrode Robert's own control.
From wikipedia.
ReluctantRenegade
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Posted: Tuesday, July 23, 2019 - 09:27 PM UTC

Quoted Text

the Airbus side stickcontrols give little visual feedback and no sensory or tactile feedback to the second pilot.



Bingo! The pilots can't FEEL nor VISUALLY CHECK what the other pilot is doing with the controls. Over to you, Gary.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kERSSRJant0&t=358s

gastec
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Posted: Wednesday, July 24, 2019 - 10:43 AM UTC
What is special, historically, about a RoCAF RB-57D?
2002hummer
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Posted: Wednesday, July 24, 2019 - 12:00 PM UTC
Was it the first confirmed kill by a SAM. The pilot came to low and was shot down by a People's Liberation Army SA-2 surface-to-air missile on October 7,1959.
gastec
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Posted: Wednesday, July 24, 2019 - 01:06 PM UTC
Correct.
2002hummer
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Posted: Thursday, July 25, 2019 - 05:17 AM UTC
This is a two part question. The US Military had many DeHavilland DHC-2 Beaver aircraft, US designation L20 during the Korean conflict.
1 What were two of the strangest cargoes carries by the Beaver
2 What were the two strangest runways used.
ReluctantRenegade
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Posted: Thursday, July 25, 2019 - 07:01 AM UTC

Quoted Text

This is a two part question. The US Military had many DeHavilland DHC-2 Beaver aircraft, US designation L20 during the Korean conflict.
1 What were two of the strangest cargoes carries by the Beaver
2 What were the two strangest runways used.



1. a piano and safes
2. a race track in Seoul and a waterfront street in Tokyo
2002hummer
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Posted: Thursday, July 25, 2019 - 12:56 PM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

This is a two part question. The US Military had many DeHavilland DHC-2 Beaver aircraft, US designation L20 during the Korean conflict.
1 What were two of the strangest cargoes carries by the Beaver
2 What were the two strangest runways used.



1. a piano and safes
2. a race track in Seoul and a waterfront street in Tokyo


You got it. You turn. I was hoping it would be a little harder.
ReluctantRenegade
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Posted: Sunday, July 28, 2019 - 10:15 PM UTC
Although the F4U Corsair was much better suited to the role, two of the four British fleet-carriers (HMS Indefatigable and HMS Implacable) operated Seafire Mk.III L/Fs as fighter-bombers during the carrier-borne aerial attacks on the Japanese main islands in mid 1945. Why?





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Posted: Monday, July 29, 2019 - 01:48 AM UTC
Wild guess: aircraft lift was too small for Corsairs?
ReluctantRenegade
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Posted: Monday, July 29, 2019 - 02:38 AM UTC
Wild, wild, but pretty close...

drabslab
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Posted: Monday, July 29, 2019 - 02:51 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Wild guess: aircraft lift was too small for Corsairs?



the plane deck was too low. The Corsair bends its wings upwards, the seafire sideways which allows it to be stored in a lower ceiling hangar
ReluctantRenegade
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Posted: Monday, July 29, 2019 - 04:08 AM UTC

Quoted Text

the plane deck was too low.



Bingo! Both the upper and lower hangars of the two Implacable class carriers had a height of 14 feet only. The one of a kind HMS Indomitable was also unable to fit Corsairs in its bigger, upper hangar (the lower was made higher at 16 feet); instead, she was the only British fleet carrier to operate Hellcats in large numbers.


Quoted Text

The Corsair bends its wings upwards, the seafire sideways which allows it to be stored in a lower ceiling hangar



The Seafire III also folded its wings upwards but it could fit into 14 feet high hangars. Here's a beautiful Seafire III walkaround:

http://aviationanoraks.co.uk/Archive/2016/2016_01_22%20Seafire%20III%20PP972/index.html

Over to you!



drabslab
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Posted: Monday, July 29, 2019 - 06:57 PM UTC
woops, now i have to think about a question, that is for this evening