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Armor/AFV
For discussions on tanks, artillery, jeeps, etc.
Trumpeter T64 Mod 75 road wheels
griffontech
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Canada
Joined: November 21, 2007
KitMaker: 120 posts
Armorama: 117 posts
Posted: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 - 07:30 AM GMT+7
Hey all,

I'm getting onto the painting of my Trumpeter T64 Mod 75. I can't find a decent image of the road wheels. I see some people paint the thin outer rim black, and even the Primeportal photos show the edge and surface that contacts the tracks black. Are the wheels completely steel, or do they have a thin layer of rubber?
Thanks
timcc2008
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United States
Joined: May 12, 2010
KitMaker: 70 posts
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Posted: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 - 07:55 AM GMT+7
Dave

My understanding is that they are full steel rims with an inner rubber dampener ring.

vr

Tim
seanmcandrews
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Pennsylvania, United States
Joined: May 09, 2009
KitMaker: 421 posts
Armorama: 418 posts
Posted: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 - 08:08 AM GMT+7
Tim's got it right

http://www.network54.com/Forum/47209/thread/1427322224/last-1427380036/View+Thread

I believe the design intent was to have them less susceptible to damage when driving through flames.

Sean
timcc2008
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Posted: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 - 08:13 AM GMT+7
A photo that I found online.

griffontech
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Canada
Joined: November 21, 2007
KitMaker: 120 posts
Armorama: 117 posts
Posted: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 - 09:30 AM GMT+7
Thanks for all the info guys. It seems like no matter how hard you look for the info someone has a better link or picture. I've literally spent days pouring through online photos and all I saw were dirty wheels covered in mud so you couldn't tell if there was rubber, or museum pieces that had the rim edges painted black.
The cross sectional diagram in the link is interesting. Seems like a complicated yet interesting way to still put some vibration dampening on a road wheel. At least you wouldn't get the rubber being torn off in big hunks by road debris.

That picture is also good. I hadn't seen that one yet.
I think I'll be painting mine in standard Soviet Green, with a well used appearance. Nothing too drastic.

Thanks again.
Das_Abteilung
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United Kingdom
Joined: August 31, 2010
KitMaker: 183 posts
Armorama: 169 posts
Posted: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 - 10:58 AM GMT+7
In essence, this is a copy of the late war German all-steel "resilient" wheel - although that was driven largely by the shortage of rubber and used an early form of synthetic rubber between the metal plates.

As you say, it completely gets around the wearing-out of rubber tyres by whatever means, and the rubber bushing lasts considerably longer. It is also very probably field-replaceable, unlike rubber rim tyres. A couple of inches of hard solid rubber gives little shock absorbing to the vehicle systems and occupants anyway.

It does, however, make a far noisier vehicle if the inside face of the track is also metal - which it looks like it is on all post-war Russian tanks. Track wear may also be increased, with the inside face becoming grooved over time, potentially shortening track life compared to using rubber-rimmed wheels. Compromises, compromises......

Regarding painting, I imagine the steel alloy used for the tracks and wheels will have a high Manganese content for wear resistance. This means that the wearing surfaces of the wheels and both faces of the tracks will not be bright silver, nor will they be graphite metallic grey. High Manganese content steel has a goldy-brown appearance, difficult to replicate and for which I have not yet found a stock colour match.
Precious_rob
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United States
Joined: March 09, 2009
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Posted: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 - 01:05 PM GMT+7
The road wheels on the t-64 where not considered a successful design by the Soviets hence why they were not repeated on subsequent tank designs afterwards, outside of being loud, wearing the track out faster and having a significantly rougher ride, the narrow profile also lead to problems of the tank digging itself into the ground if it threw a track due to the high ground pressure. From what Ive read recovery crews completely hated the t-64 just for that reason alone.
KurtLaughlin
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Pennsylvania, United States
Joined: January 18, 2003
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Posted: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 - 01:22 PM GMT+7

Quoted Text

Regarding painting, I imagine the steel alloy used for the tracks and wheels will have a high Manganese content for wear resistance. This means that the wearing surfaces of the wheels and both faces of the tracks will not be bright silver, nor will they be graphite metallic grey. High Manganese content steel has a goldy-brown appearance, difficult to replicate and for which I have not yet found a stock colour match.



Most modern construction equipment uses high manganese steel for the buckets, blades, and implements. Once the surface oxide wears off they look quite steel-like.





KL
seanmcandrews
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Pennsylvania, United States
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Posted: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 - 11:42 PM GMT+7

Quoted Text

From what Ive read recovery crews completely hated the t-64 just for that reason alone.



Could you point me to where you've read that Rob ? I'd also be interested in knowing what they had to say.

Sean
griffontech
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Canada
Joined: November 21, 2007
KitMaker: 120 posts
Armorama: 117 posts
Posted: Wednesday, November 15, 2017 - 05:20 AM GMT+7
Thanks for the pics. I like the rust on the dozer blade and will try and replicate it on my T90 with blade when I get to it.