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Review
ICM: Leichttraktor Rheinmetall 1930
CMOT
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Posted: Sunday, April 14, 2019 - 08:48 AM UTC


Darren Baker takes a look at the Leichttraktor Rheinmetall 1930 from ICM in 1/35th scale before digging out the glue and paint.

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If you have comments or questions please post them here.

Thanks!
RobinNilsson
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Posted: Sunday, April 14, 2019 - 10:00 AM UTC
Aaaarrrgghhhhh......
Rubber bands ....

Maybe if I let it sit in the stash long enough there might be aftermarket tracks ....
/ Robin
Taeuss
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Posted: Sunday, April 14, 2019 - 10:11 AM UTC
Too right! Those tracks are pretty sad by modern standards. The complete lack of any discernible detail on the inner surface is positively 1960s. Ouch.
RobinNilsson
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Posted: Sunday, April 14, 2019 - 10:47 AM UTC
Unless the real things were rubber bands but I sort of doubt it.
Was industry at that time able to make rubber band tracks?
The US half tracks had rubber bands ....
CMOT
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Posted: Sunday, April 14, 2019 - 11:24 AM UTC
Ill be honest and say that I think you could get away with them and if a preferential offering is made later could easily be swapped out.
panzerbob01
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Posted: Sunday, April 14, 2019 - 12:18 PM UTC
Regarding possible paint schemes...

Some sort of tricolor-with-edging (or painted-in separating boundaries) would, I think, be very likely for this vehicle in the time-period it was trialled in.

1930 was definitely in the "inter-war" period. Historically, the Germans had applied both soft-edged and bounded hard-edge schemes to their domestically-produced artillery and tanks (such as the AV7), as well as to aircraft during WWI. Camo schemes were in use with the "Reichswehr" during the early 1930's on trucks and artillery, and the 4-color "Buntfarben-Anstricht" schemes were applied to the first "tanks" (Pz. 1a) adopted starting from late 1933. German armored vehicles and artillery switched to using the dark grey base-coat with 1/3 brown bi-color scheme in 1938 - so the late 30's would be the period when one might reasonably expect all-grey vehicles in German service - not so likely in 1930.

Historical photos of the Rheinmetall LT in ca 1930 show that both Rheinmetall and Krupp trials tanks sported evident camo patterns.These would be "pre-formal Buntfarben-A scheme" bi- and tricolor schemes. So I would probably plan on doing a camo scheme on one of these, were I to challenge its rubber-band tracks

"Stylistically-speaking", a camo scheme is appropriate. Whether the exact colors used in 1930 match what this kit's color-scheme calls for is another question entirely...

Note that both Rheinmetall-Borsig and Krupp fielded trials-versions of the "LeichtTraktor" - and the RM-B version was seen in two different wheel-configurations and with and without wheel-covers. The mud-chute side-plates covered the 8-small-wheel w coil springs suspension RM-B design. The alternative RM-B suspension was 4 larger wheels with different leaf-spring sets. The Krupp version was pretty different in hull and turret design and suspension, and used the mixed-size road-wheel set - with photos showing it w and w/out complete and partial mud-chute side-plates. And camo patterns included both hard-edge and soft-edge / sprayed types, per numerous photos, of both types.

I can imagine at least 3 - maybe 4 - different Leichttraktor kits coming along... 2 RM-B versions featuring the 2 different suspension systems, and 1 or 2 Krupp versions, featuring Krupp w/ and w/out mud-chute side-plates (however, the Krupp version(s) will need a new hull and turret along with its different suspension system...)

On a different, "comparative technology", note: The different suspensions seen in the photos all later appeared in the Pz.III development... And it's pretty interesting that both RM-B and Krupp utilized an "engine-forward" design - sort of reminiscent of the British WWI "Whippet" tank - coupled with a rear-crew-entry hatch and a rear-mounted turret... Notably, both format features essentially vanished from German tank design, which moved to driver-forward, engine-rear, turret-mid forms for WWII.

And... An interior kit would be just the cat's meow! There are some pretty good photos showing some of that interior, so... :-)

Cheers! Bob
RobinNilsson
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Posted: Monday, April 15, 2019 - 12:59 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Ill be honest and say that I think you could get away with them and if a preferential offering is made later could easily be swapped out.



umhum,
lots of dirt & muck can hide a lot of nonexisting details
BootsDMS
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Posted: Monday, April 15, 2019 - 08:38 AM UTC
Well Hats off to ICM I say! Rejoice - it's not another bloody Tiger or Panther.

Not separate track links? Well dear God - how about we suck that up and actually model the damn thing.

With the chance of a decent colour scheme - the Reichsheer version of Buntfarbeanstricht - if I've got that right) - this could be a really interesting model on the display tables.

Thanks Darren - this could be a great little model; one can only hope for a Grosstraktor follow up.

Brian