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Dioramas: Flora & Fauna
Trees, shrubs, nature and animals.
Hosted by Darren Baker
What kind of tree
Biggles2
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Quebec, Canada
Joined: January 01, 2004
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Posted: Thursday, June 06, 2019 - 05:52 AM UTC
Allo, M. Frenchy (or anyone else). Can you identify the type of trees these are in the background:



I haven't seen any like that locally (Quebec), or anywhere else in Canada.

jrutman
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Pennsylvania, United States
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Posted: Thursday, June 06, 2019 - 06:04 AM UTC
Looks to me like a locust or maple tree that has a lot of mistletow or ivy growing on the trunk. Hard to tell from this distance.
Biggles2
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Quebec, Canada
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Posted: Thursday, June 06, 2019 - 06:22 AM UTC
Hmmm...we have millions of Maple trees locally (including one in my backyard). None of them look like that - even without Mistletow or Ivy.
dpeterso
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California, United States
Joined: January 15, 2012
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Posted: Thursday, June 06, 2019 - 06:29 AM UTC
This looks like some type of Elm or Beech tree that is being strangled by a type of vine. Not sure what the vine is (possibly English Ivy or something like Kudzu).

This is English Ivy growing up trees

jrutman
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Pennsylvania, United States
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Posted: Thursday, June 06, 2019 - 07:07 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Hmmm...we have millions of Maple trees locally (including one in my backyard). None of them look like that - even without Mistletow or Ivy.



You focused on the type of tree. The important part is that it is getting choked by a parasite plant or vine growing up its' trunk,whether it's Maple,birch,whatever.
J
Frenchy
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Rhone, France
Joined: December 02, 2002
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Posted: Friday, June 07, 2019 - 01:24 AM UTC
Poplars (quite common in Normandy...) + ivy ?







H.P.
Biggles2
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Quebec, Canada
Joined: January 01, 2004
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Posted: Friday, June 07, 2019 - 03:07 AM UTC
Thanks. I knew you'd know! We have Poplars here too, but a different variety. Does the ivy, or misteltoe, choke off the lower branches and leaves? Or do those Poplars grow like that?
cheyenne
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New Jersey, United States
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Posted: Friday, June 07, 2019 - 03:24 AM UTC
Actually they could be any type of tree native to the area . The weird look of the tree comes from people " elevating " , which means cutting off the lower branches and just leaving the crown of the tree . This method is supposed to deter the growth of the tree any higher . On these particular trees some type of ivy or vine has grown around the tree . Another term for this practice is " pollarding " , I used to do a lot of tree removal , pruning , elevating , forestry etc in my youth . So unless you can see the leaves of the tree any id of the tree is only guessing .
jrutman
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Pennsylvania, United States
Joined: April 10, 2011
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Armorama: 7,405 posts
Posted: Friday, June 07, 2019 - 05:50 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Actually they could be any type of tree native to the area . The weird look of the tree comes from people " elevating " , which means cutting off the lower branches and just leaving the crown of the tree . This method is supposed to deter the growth of the tree any higher . On these particular trees some type of ivy or vine has grown around the tree . Another term for this practice is " pollarding " , I used to do a lot of tree removal , pruning , elevating , forestry etc in my youth . So unless you can see the leaves of the tree any id of the tree is only guessing .



Totally true.
Another reason for missing lower branches is the locals cut the small branches off the bottom to use as fire and/or cooking wood,etc. in places where there is limited access to forests.
J