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Scratchbuilders!: Armor/AFV
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That makes sense !
GeneralFailure
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Joined: February 15, 2002
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Posted: Wednesday, February 27, 2002 - 05:36 AM UTC


At several postings, I found remarks that make good sense, though I never reflected on them.
I thought it might be a good idea to list them here, sort of "basic principles of scratchbuilding" (or even modeling for that matter....).

I thought I'd list a few here. If the list becomes interesting, we can make this a feature article for youngsters who join in.



1) Take care of safely. Some tools can cut you. Some chemicals are harmful. Some products are inflammable. Keep all that away from small children, allways.

2) Cleanliness. Make sure you have a clean desk, clean hands, clean tools... if you want a perfect model.

3) Build experience first. When you try out a new scratchbuilding/painting/modeling technique for the first time, don't try it on your model. Experiment with an old model or on another object first.


What other modeling "rules" should be standard operating practice for every modeler ?

TreadHead
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Joined: January 12, 2002
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Posted: Wednesday, February 27, 2002 - 06:24 AM UTC
Patience is a Virtue....
Sabot
Joined: December 18, 2001
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Posted: Wednesday, February 27, 2002 - 07:27 AM UTC

Quoted Text

3) Build experience first. When you try out a new scratchbuilding/painting/modeling technique for the first time, don't try it on your model. Experiment with an old model or on another object first.


I just want to echo Jan's sentiment here. Many of today's modeler's are quick to dismiss some kits because "the slope is off 2%" or "the turret is missing the flux capacitor". Or worst of all, "don't build it, give that POS to the neighborhood kids to beat with a baseball bat."
I think this is wrong. I think of the older kits as practice fodder before I start one of the newer kits of the same subject. It's also good to have a "clean" model to practice airbrushing the latest camo technique/weathering/brand of paint/etc. on before you commit paint to the $40 kit with $30 worth of aftermarket accessories on. Or try one of the welding bead suggestions or some other hint obtained.

Build it, it might just look good, besides, unless you plan on entering it into a contest, who cares if the main gun on that kit is not off-of center by 5% like on the real thing?
ArmouredSprue
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South Australia, Australia
Joined: January 09, 2002
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Posted: Wednesday, February 27, 2002 - 08:27 AM UTC
Jan,
You´re completely right, it´ll be an essential tool for me, indeed!
Rob,
As always you´re right, I do agree with you in all aspects (besides that, my cabinet is fullfilled with the old Tamiya´s)
HTH
Beto
GunTruck
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Joined: December 01, 2001
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Posted: Wednesday, February 27, 2002 - 08:54 AM UTC
Wash Your Hands!

Sounds silly, but skin oils and fingerprints really muck-up a otherwise nice model...

Gunnie
GeneralFailure
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Posted: Friday, March 01, 2002 - 04:15 AM UTC
1) Have fun . Modeling must be fun. When you think it gets boring, leave it be for a while. Get out. Do something different. No problem. Do it ! Before you know it, you"ll be dying to be back at your modeling table anyway !.

2) Safety . Some tools can cut you. Some chemicals are harmful. Some products are inflammable. Keep all that away from small children, allways.

3) Cleanliness. Make sure you have a clean desk. Wash your hands before you start. Dust is your enemy. Make sure you use clean tools... if you want a perfect model.

4) Experience. When you try out a new scratchbuilding/painting/modeling technique for the first time, don't try it on your model. Experiment with an old model or on another object first.

5) Patience. A good model is worth some of your time. There's no way around working precisely and meticulously.

6) A clear view. Make sure you SEE what you're doing. A magnifying glass can come in handy, but you just cannot model without proper lighting. Use one or several lights to clear up your working table ... if you don't have full daylight.



OK. Here's a roundup. Who has more ?

HunterCottage
#116
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Stockholm, Sweden
Joined: December 19, 2001
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Posted: Friday, March 01, 2002 - 04:23 AM UTC
Preparation I guess is a part of the patience area, but I find myself more pleased with my efforts if I make sure what I am doing, how I would like to do it and taking my time when I am doing it. As the addage says "Rome wasn't built in one day."
YodaMan
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Posted: Friday, March 01, 2002 - 04:47 AM UTC
You know, you should maybe do a walkthrough of building a model. Basically, examining the major phases in building a model, step by step. First, how to clean up the model; answering questions like 'what is flash?','how do I fill these sink holes?'. Then, look at what you need to glue together befor painting, and what you shouldn't glue until after you paint. So, really the idea would be to make a possible 'Complete Idiot's Guide to Modelbuilding'!
You know, not that I need it... *nervously looking from side to side*

YodaMan
drewgimpy
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Posted: Wednesday, March 06, 2002 - 03:35 PM UTC

Quoted Text

I think of the older kits as practice fodder before I start one of the newer kits of the same subject. It's also good to have a "clean" model to practice airbrushing the latest camo technique/weathering/brand of paint/etc. on before you commit paint to the $40 kit with $30 worth of aftermarket accessories on.



I put this into practice tonight and think I will be very glad I did. As a lot of you know I am building my first armor model, a M4 Sherman. I got the 1/35 tamiya kit with a gift certificate from Christmas. I also got a 1/72 sherman as a stocking stuffer. It is an airfix total POS. I wasn't going to build it for that reason. What changed my mind is the fact that I am going to try so many things for the first time, that I want to test it on something cheap first. Most the things I am going to try should turn out ok, but I am going to try using oils for washing and dry brushing on a model for the first time and have no idea how it will turn out. I would hate to ruin a model I have put so much time into. I through together the smaller model and will test things out on it first. If it doesn't go so well I won't use it on my good model and will still be able to display it when I am done. Anyway, I think thats great advice.

One more thing I would like to add to the list is HAVE FUN. Don't get so caught up in things that it becomes a chore
GeneralFailure
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Posted: Thursday, March 07, 2002 - 06:48 AM UTC
Drew,

you're so right ! I should have put that on number one ! Please forgive me, I am not worthy...
Now let's see what we can do. I saw Jim do it before...

maybe ... :::::zip::::::

no. Let's try .... :::::woosh::::::

nothing...mmm... :::::::poof ! :::::::

It worked ! It worked ! It's right in there on number one !


:-)

Jan


Never draw fire. It irritates everyone around you.